Engaging Your Audience Beyond Words

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Ensuring that an audience is comfortable and has the right view is often crucial to giving speakers the best possible chance to connect with them.

Reach New Heights With Your Audience

When it comes to public speaking at business conventions, industry experts tend to place great emphasis on how the speaker should engage with the audience. While effective speaking certainly goes a long way, it’s often just as important to put the audience in a position to receive that message.

Optimal Use of Space

One way a professional event coordinator can be a big help is with optimal use of the available space. It’s important to give a lot of thought to the layout of audience seating. Sure, a grid may allow you to pack in the most seats, but that position often isn’t conducive to what you’re trying to achieve. Strive to create sections that have a strong view and clear access to audio.

Raising Seat Level

The seating riser rentals in Las Vegas that event coordinators use are often an excellent means of doing more with the space you have. Risers provide a better view to the event stage for audience members further back. This technique also lets you take advantage of a traditional grid layout while avoiding some of the shortcomings for those in the back and on the edges.

A Herringbone Approach

The herringbone seat layout is similar to a traditional classroom layout but with the seating angled in toward the stage. In some cases, central rows will be horizontally positioned, and the outer rows will be angled. This approach helps to make the event stage the centerpiece. However, it requires special attention to access, which is particularly important for events that extend over a long period.

Using a Roving Microphone

If you have a large audience for an event that allows for audience interaction, then a great way to make that audience seem smaller is to have a rover. The roving speaker has a wireless microphone and coordinates with the main speaker. The rover can ask questions to audience members in the back and can even speak at length at times in order to shift the audience focus to the back.

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